English is a unique subject

  1. Create – you will be encouraged to experiment with different forms, audiences and styles.
  2. Empathise – through reading, you will see things through others’ eyes and learn to walk in others’ shoes.
  3. Empower – in becoming more literate, you will be able to engage and function in the world around you.
  4. Communicate – you will be able to express your opinion effectively in speech, writing and through group work.
  5. Analyse –you will be encouraged to become critical readers of written texts including the media and new technologies.
  6. Engage – through the texts we study you will learn about philosophy, history and religion and cultures that might be very different from your own.
  7. Enjoy – you will learn about the magic of words: their meanings, sounds, imagery and symbolism.
  8. Be confident – in lessons you can take risks without the fear of being “wrong”.
  9. Listen – you will learn the value of listening and thinking so that you can a learner for life.
  10. Imagine – you are invited to bring your imagination to English lessons and stretch it as far as it will go.

What Will You Do - KS3?

Please see below for Year 7, 8 & 9 Expectations and Outlines

 

Year 7 Expectations and Outline: Welcome to Year 7 English!

Welcome to English at St Benedict’s. We will have high expectations of you in terms of your learning, behaviour and organisation.  We expect you to bring a reading book to every lesson, to spend at least 30 minutes on homework tasks set, and be punctual in attending lesson and in giving in homework. When set written homework, there is an expectation that you will proof-read your work carefully before submission and be attentive to presentation.

You will find that the course will be more demanding than Literacy at your Primary School. Your teacher will be very happy to support you throughout the year.  In return, we expect you to take some risks and experiment in your writing, reading, speaking and listening.

Year 7 Exam: Your exam will take place in  June 2017.

Term Assessment Focus Information One lesson a week…

 

1 Initial writing assessment – “All about me”, handwriting, reading and spelling tests. These tests are nothing to worry about. It’s just a chance for us to see what level you are at the moment so we know how to support you. Library resources and reading skills – You will spend time getting to know the library and also developing your range of reading skills.
1 and 2 Prose textLondon Eye Mystery or Holes

Literature – PEE questions.

Writing –– Creative Writing.

You will study a modern prose text. You will be asked to write a story based on your prose text. Speaking and Listening – group presentation on Seven Wonders.
3 Poetry – Literature – Poetry Comparison

Speaking and Listening – group discussion.

 

You will study and compare a variety of different poems based around animals and also assess animal poems in a group talk. Exam Preparation

You will revise and further develop your reading analysis and descriptive writing skills through the theme of Children and Education.

4

 

Genre – Writing  – short story in chosen genre. Timed assessment.

 

You will experiment in writing in different genres.
5

 

 

 

 

Shakespeare and Persuasion – Writing – Persuasive Speech. Timed assessment. You will create a persuasive speech, find out about the context of Shakespeare’s life, and may visit either the RSC or Shakespeare’s birthplace. Shakespeare Research Task

You will create an informative resource based around the life and work of William Shakespeare.

 

6

 

 First Person Narratives – Reading – Comparing famous diary entries. Timed assessment. You will study different styles of first person narrative, including comparing some famous diary entries (eg. Pepys and Anne Frank). You may also conduct some related drama work.

 

Year 8 Expectations and Outline: Welcome to Year 8 English!

Year 8 will allow you to build on the skills you have developed in Year 7 by further broadening your knowledge and understanding of a range of different forms of reading, writing and speaking and listening. We will continue to have high expectations of you in terms of your learning, behaviour and organisation.  We expect you to bring a reading book to every lesson, except where a class reader is being used, to spend at least 30 minutes on homework tasks set, and be punctual in attending lesson and in giving in homework. When set written homework, there is an expectation that you will proof-read your work carefully before submission and be attentive to presentation.

Your teacher will be very happy to support you throughout the year.  In return, we expect you to take some risks and experiment in your writing, reading, speaking and listening.

Year 8 Exam Date: w/c 21st March 2017

Term Assessment Focus Information
1 Prose

Reading – prose text – Ten P.E.E. questions/essay (depending on set) Assessment: Literature

 

Writing – a non-fiction piece of writing inspired by one of the texts studied. For example, a page for a textbook about ‘Life in the Trenches’.

You will study one of the following texts: The Boy in the Striped Pyjamas, Revolver, Private Peaceful. In this unit you will develop your reading and writing skills. As well as reading a novel, you will explore some examples of non-fiction texts.

You will use the texts studied as inspiration to create a descriptive piece of non-fiction writing.

2 Poetry

Writingcreate a poem. All strands. Assessment: Language (writing).

 

Reading – respond to an unseen poem as part of the Y8 exams.

Assessment: Literature

In this unit you will explore a range of poetry from different cultures across time. You will also create a poem and contribute to a class anthology.
3 Islands

Writing – islands writing task, an adventure story. All strands. This will be completed at the start of the unit. Assessment: Language(writing). This will be a timed assessment.

 

Reading – A non-fiction ‘question 2’ style task, from texts in the ‘Survival’ unit. . You will need to look at “Scrambles among the Alps’ and ‘A True Story of Survival in the Artic’. Write a summary of the different experiences of being in the Alps. Use details from both sources. This will be a timed assessment. Assessment: Language (reading).

You will explore some contemporary and 19th Century examples of travel writing. You will develop the ability to use sensory imagery in descriptive writing and improve vocabulary.

 

4 Non-fiction and Media

Speaking and listening – a persuasive speech about animal cruelty, delivered in role as character, for example, as an animal rights activist.  – Use AQA S+ L criteria

Preparation for exams

Exam – Assessment: Language (reading and writing)

Respond to an unseen poem. Assessment: Literature

You will study a range of non-fiction and media texts. This will help you to prepare for the Year 8 exam, which will take place straight after the Easter holidays. In the exam, you will be expected to compare two texts and create a piece of non-fiction writing.
5 Gothic Fiction  –

Writing – Create the opening 500 words of a narrative. . Assessment: Language (writing).

 

 

During this unit, you will develop both your reading and writing skills. You will study extract of texts from different eras. You will plan a story in a similar style.  You will also be inspired to choose a reading book to complement the unit. Examples could be Darren Shan’s ‘Cirque du Freak’ or Marcus Sedgwick’s ‘My Sword Hand is Singing’.
6 A Midsummer Night’s Dream

Reading – an analysis of a key scene, such as Act 2 Scene 1.

Assessment: Literature

Opportunities to develop confidence in speaking and listening and writing.

This unit will provide an exciting introduction to one of Shakespeare’s most magical plays. You will develop confidence when analysing Shakespeare’s language. You will take part in a drama focused activity. You will perform part of the play in front of an audience. This could be The Mechanicals’ play within the play.

 

Year 9 Expectations and Outline: Welcome to Year 9 English!

This is an important year that provides invaluable preparation for your GCSE studies.  We will have high expectations of you in terms of your learning, behaviour and organisation.  We expect you to bring a reading book to every lesson, except where a class reader is being used, to spend at least 45 minutes on homework tasks set, and be punctual in attending lesson and in giving in homework. When set written homework, there is an expectation that you will proof-read your work carefully before submission and be attentive to presentation.

You will find the course will be more demanding as we prepare you for the rigours of studies at a higher level.  Your teacher will be very happy to support you throughout the year.  In return, we expect you to take some risks and experiment in your writing, reading, speaking and listening.

Year 9 Exam Date: w/c 23rd January 2017

Term Assessment Focus Information GCSE link
1-2 Initial testing

 

 

 

Literature – Prose text – Timed extract http://www.buyambienmed.com/buy-ambien-online/ response and an analytical essay

 

 

 

Linked group discussion

You will complete reading, spelling and handwriting tests in the first week, followed by baseline testing of reading and writing using a Yr 9 Fiction exam paper.

 

You will study a modern prose text with a focus on narrative perspective.  You will learn about the Literature exam at GCSE and practice responding to an extract.  You will also learn revision skills and make revision notes on the text.  You will then have the opportunity to develop a longer written response to the novel.

 

You will develop your ability to lead, make decisions and develop the complexity of your contributions during group discussion.

The Yr 9 Fiction exam paper mirrors an exam paper that you will sit at GCSE.

 

 

You will be required to study prose texts as part of your GCSE studies.

 

 

 

 

You will be asked to complete a speaking and listening assessment as part of your GCSE course.

3 Speaking and Listening – The Tempest – speech presenting an argument in response to a quotation (with reference to context)

 

 

 

Exam preparation – Non-Fiction Reading and Writing and Literature (prose)

 

 

 

Begin sci-fi/ dystopian unit

In addition to developing your speaking and listening skills, you will develop your analytical response to Shakespeare’s language and structural choices, as well as understanding how context affects interpretation.  You will respond to critical opinions about characters.

You will also complete some argumentative/ persuasive writing in preparation for the upcoming exams.

 

You will use previous years’ papers to develop your understanding of what will be required in your exam.

Pre-nineteenth century non-fiction texts are also built into the various units that you study this year.

You will revise and be examined on the prose text that you studied in the Autumn term.

You will study a whole Shakespeare text at GCSE.

You will write argumentatively/ persuasively for examination at GCSE.   There is a particular focus on writing accurately, with attention paid to spelling, punctuation, grammar and vocabulary.

 

Your exam is set by AQA and is designed to replicate a GCSE non-fiction paper.

 

 

At GCSE you are examined on a prose text using the same format as this exam question.

4 Writing – Dystopian Fiction – Short story

 

 

Start poetry through the ages

You will study and create dystopian texts.  We will be encouraging you to read widely, including non-fiction texts, and to expand your vocabulary, making appropriate choices for purpose and audience. You will write creatively at GCSE.  We will use assessments such as this to collect evidence of any access arrangements required at GCSE, such as extra time, or scribing.
 5

 

Literature – Poetry through the ages – Skills building and timed practice

 

Unseen Poetry comparison – GCSE criteria

 

Start Journeys

This AQA unit on poetry through the ages will introduce you to a diverse and challenging mix of poetic texts through time.

 

 

You will study and write a comparative assessment of unseen poems.

You will develop your ability and confidence to: listen, read, annotate and analyse poetry in all its forms, as well as preparing for unseen texts.

 

This is the task you will be asked to do in one of your GCSE Literature exams.

 

6 Reading and Writing – Journeys – Skills building and timed practice

 

Speaking and Listening – The Secret Life of Walter Mitty – linked formal presentation

 

 

Creative Industries – group project

This unit (adapted from an AQA scheme) on the theme of journeys will introduce you to a variety of unseen and challenging texts and improve your critical reading skills.

 

You will be expected to research and produce a formal presentation, developing your confidence and ability to deliver a script using prompt cards and create appropriate visual aids using PowerPoint or Prezi.

 

You will learn about this career sector as you compete ‘for funding’ for a film trailer that you will design.

Aiming to build strong foundations for GCSE, this unit will also develop your reading and writing skills and ability to work to time.

 

 

 

As well as developing important life skills, these tasks will further prepare you for GCSE speaking and listening assessment.

 


 

Please find links below to the Grading documents:

What Will You Do - KS4?

The GCSE English and English Language Course

The English Language GCSE has a greater focus on making sure that students are able to write clearly and accurately, in good Standard English. There is an increased emphasis on spelling, punctuation and grammar including the use of vocabulary. Speaking and Listening is assessed through endorsement; there is a clearer focus on teaching students to become more confident in formal speaking.

GCSE English Expectations (link to document)

The new English Literature GCSE encourages students to read a wide range of classic literature fluently and there is an increased assessment of unseen texts. To succeed in the qualification, it is essential that students are in the habit of reading regularly. Additionally, the quality of writing in the responses to texts is assessed.

Grading (link to document)

All English GCSEs have terminal assessment with no controlled assessment. Tiers are removed from GCSE English Language and GCSE English Literature. This means that specifications and question papers have to cover the full range of abilities.

GCSE English Language Overview:

Exam 1: Explorations in Creative Reading and Writing (50% of GCSE)

1 hour 45 minutes

Exam 2: Writers’ Viewpoints and Perspectives (50% of GCSE)

1 hour 45 minutes

Section A:  Reading (25% of GCSE) – students will be issued with one extract from a literature fiction text from the 20th or 21st century. Students will be asked to respond to 4 questions, considering how established writers use narrative and descriptive techniques to capture the interest of the reader. Section A: Reading (25% of GCSE) – students will be issued with two linked sources from different time periods (one from the 19th century and from either the 20th or 21st century) and different genres. Students will be asked to consider how each presents a perspective or viewpoint to influence the reader.
Section B:  Writing (25% of GCSE) – students will write their own creative text, inspired by the topic in Section A, to demonstrate their narrative and descriptive skills Section B: Writing (25% of GCSE) – students will produce a written text for a specified audience, purpose and form in which they give their own perspective on the theme introduced in Section A.

GCSE English Literature Overview:

Exam 1: Shakespeare and the 19th century novel

1 hour 45 minutes

Exam 2: Writers’ Viewpoints and Perspectives (50% of GCSE)

1 hour 45 minutes

Section A: Shakespeare: Macbeth or Romeo and Juliet

 

Students will answer one question based on an extract from the play. They will also be required to make references to the play as a whole.

Section A:  Modern prose or drama: An Inspector Calls.

 

Students will answer one question, from a choice of two, on the play. The question will relate to a key character, theme or idea.

Section B:   The 19th century novel: A Christmas Carol, Dr Jekyll and Mr Hyde, Frankenstein, Great Expectations

 

Students will answer one question based on an extract from the novel. They will also be required to make references to the novel as a whole.

 

Section B:  Poetry – students will be asked to compare two poems from the ‘Power and Conflict’ anthology studied in class. One poem will be named and students choose the second poem.

 

Section C:  Unseen poetry – students will complete one question on an unseen poem and one question comparing the two unseen poems

 

Please click on this link for the GCSE Course Outline

 

Digital resources

  1. BBC bitesize is worth exploring: http://www.bbc.co.uk/education/. There are revision materials for English Language and English Literature.
  1. Digital Theatre is a fantastic resource: https://www.digitaltheatreplus.com/ All St Benedict’s students have free access. Ask your teacher for the login. This enables students to watch high quality films of leading theatre productions including versions Shakespeare texts. There’s an opportunity to discover how plays are brought to the stage in interviews with the creative team and learn about interpretive choice through detailed analysis of play texts.
  1. Cambridge Schools Shakespeare: http://www.cambridgeschoolshakespeare.com/ is very useful in providing extra information to support the study of Shakespeare. Your son/daughter can register for free as a student to explore extensive resources related to the staging, themes and characters and language of the Shakespeare plays.
  1. Cambridge Elevate: https://elevate.cambridge.org/elevate/Login.aspx  Ask your teacher for the login.

 Other Opportunities 

  • We offer the Arvon Creative writing course each year for sixteen fortunate year 10 and year 12 students: http://www.arvon.org/schoolsandgroups/ This year we are going to Totleigh Barton in Devon during February half term.

 Theatre 

  • We are very fortunate to have the Royal Shakespeare Theatre in Stratford so close at hand, and there are regular theatre trips.

Reading 

For further information contact Mrs. R. Hursey, Head of the English Department